Do you need local antivirus?

We have posted on this blog before that you should not be paying for local antivirus if you are using Kibosh to protect your network. You don’t need to. Because in addition to our propriatary pronogrpahy filtering, Kibosh delivers Enteprise grade Malware, Phishing, Torrent and illegal proxy blocking.

Having worked as Network Engineer for over 20 years, I believe that the only way to really protect your devices these days is with a service like Kibosh,or OpenDNS which blocks access to the bad stuff before you access it. Local antivirus starts working after you’ve accessed the bad stuff. And don’t get me started about the useless ‘web filter’ option these antivirus companies have started offering. I’ve yet to see one that blocked any bad content, but they do proxy all of your data, including HTTPS, through their servers. I’m surprised there hasn’t been a lawsuit yet.

Also, why are many antivirus suites free? How can anyone build a successful business giving away free antivirus, or anything else for that matter? I’m not sure, but i don’t think it can be done. So, they are making money somehow. Maybe selling information about you like AVG does?

An antivirus app has complete access to your operating system – deep level kernal access, and if this antivirus app is compromised in any way your basically toast. How would you ever know? You wouldn’t unless you detected some odd behaviors on your computer.

Anyway, the world is catching on to the downside of using local antivirus:

If you are running Windows use Security Essentials (XP, 7) or Windows Defender (8, 10, +). If your running Linux or OSX you probably don’t need local antivirus.

Bottom line, with Kibosh on the job you don’t need to pay for an antivirus product.

Be wise. Be safe.

Scott

 

Antivirus.

Kibosh Cloud customers should not be paying for local antivirus of any kind. In the past we’ve recommended Microsoft’s Security Essentials, but they’ve since stopped supporting that in favor of Windows Defender which only works on Windows 8 & 10.

So for those of us still using Windows XP , Vista or 7 we’ll need to find another local antivirus. When searching for an Antivirus solution please keep the following points in mind:

  1. Kibosh Cloud provides an excellent layer of malware, and phishing website protection. It blocks the site before you get to it, so it will block phishing email links, thus preventing the downloading / installation of malware.
  2. You only need local antivirus. You do not need any other feature all Antivirus companies try to upsell you. Let’s use the popular Avast as an example. It’s free to download and use, but be prepaired for the hard sell of ‘Internet Security’, ‘Email Protection’, and ‘Pro Antivirus’. You need none of these addional features, just use the ‘Free Antivirus’.
    1. What is ‘Internet Security’? It means they are sending your data through their servers and it’s being logged. Email security? Same thing, they are scanning all of your emails to give you protection. If you have a private domain with your own email address (i.e., non gmail, yahoo, live, etc) then maybe Email Security would be something to consider, but for the vast majority of us who use one of the popular, free email services like gmail – they already scan your email and block the bad stuff.
  3. Antivirus, once installed, has intimate access to your operating system. It must to provide the protection you need. Thus Antivirus is a highly desireable target for the ‘bad guys’.
    1. Is your Antivirus Software Vulnerable to Attack?
    2. Antivirus is dead: Long live Antivirus!
  4. The biggest points of threat on your Windows devices is in fact the third party apps like Java, Flash, Adobe, etc. All these apps are regularly asking you to install updates to block new, known, attacks. Keep them updated.

In summary, with Kibosh Cloud protecting your devices you only need a simple, free local antivrus for that added layer of security, but there are trade offs. Personally we still use Security Essentials + WinPatrol (the free version) + Kibosh Cloud.

Never 10

Hi Everyone,

Many users of Windows 7 and 8.1 are happy with their current version of Windows, and have no wish to upgrade to Windows 10. There are many reasons for this, but among them is the fact that Windows 10 has become controversial due to Microsoft’s evolution of their Windows operating system platform into a service which, among other things, aggressively monitors and reports on its users activities.

Never 10 is an easy to use utility which gives you control over whether your Windows 7 or 8.1 will upgrade itself to Windows 10. Never 10 will permanently remove the annoying upgrade reminders!

Get Never 10 here.

Never 10 does not install, it simply runs when you execute it, does it’s job, then goes away.
Enjoy.

Scott Thompson

Phishing E-mail Example

Hi Everyone,

This is an excellent example of a phishing e-mail (see below). An e-mail drafted to look and sound legitimate with attachments that contain malware, or hyperlinks that open to infected web pages. This particular phishing attempt had an attachment (which has been removed).

We can’t stress enough to never, ever open any attachment or follow any link from an email – no matter how legitimate it looks. Yes it’s inconvenient, but that is the digital world we live in today.

Malware today will encrypt your data and hold it ransom, along with the rest of the network’s data:

•    Hospital declares ‘internal state of emergency’ after ransomeware infection.
•    LA Hospital pays nearly $17,000 to restore data.

Many of us use multiple layers of protection:

  1. local antivirus
  2. SPAM firewall (all free e-mail services use these),
  3. DNS filtering i.e., Kibosh Filtering Service

But these tools, or any other, can only block what they know about. There are plenty of exploits unknown by any security vendor.

So when in doubt – throw it out!

Kibosh

—-PHISHING EXAMPLE—–
—–Original Message—–
From: Tia Fleming [mailto:FlemingTia78752@ecolboxmoveis.com.br]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 7:22 AM
To: Doe, John <john.doe@somedomain.com>
Subject: Requested receipt ID:8E767D

Dear doe, John

Please find attached your receipt, sent as requested.

We are making improvements to our billing systems to help serve you better and because of that the attached invoice will look different from your previous ones.

Kind regards,
Tia Fleming
Divisional Managing Director

Beware mobile games with ads.

A growing trend with mobile game producers, in an effort to generate revenue, is in-game-ads, and in-game-purchasing.

In regards to in-game-purchasing, the game is free to install and play, and one can purchase gold coins, or jewels i.e., some form of game currency which you then use to purchase upgrades, new levels, new characters etc. Typically one can also play to unlock these features, but paying is much faster.

From a family safe perspective in-game-purchasing is an acceptable form of generating revenue.  A few popular examples:

  • Pixel Gun
  • Clash of Clans

In regards to in-game-ads, the game is free to install and play, but one must watch randomly placed ads to continue playing the game, and/or unlock new features.  Sometimes these are full page ads that open in a browser, and in many cases play a video.  Most in-game-ads give you the option to skip or close the ad, but not before you’ve basically seen the gist of the ad, and closing it isn’t always easy, especially for kids.

So what’s wrong with in-game-ads? As recently noted in the Independent.co.uk:

Examples of games with pop-up ads one must watch to play:

  • My Talking Tom Tom
    • On their appstore page, they state the are PRIVO certified to protect your childs privacy and personal information. Apparently this doesn’t include protection against adult content.
  • Star Wars Rebel Alliance

Are some games with in-game-ads better than others? Not really because the developer(s) creating the game use third party companies to generate the ads, and there are only a few companies that create the ads, like AdMob.

App developers are looking to get paid for their work, and their options for generating revenue are:

  1. Sell the game outright with no ads
  2. Give the game away for free, but generate revenue by selling in-game-currency / items
  3. Give the game away for free, and place ads through out the game
    1. The ads are outsourced to third party companies like AdMob

So all in-game-ads are actually controlled by a few companies, much like the Mainstream Media we deal with today. I.E., if one game is showing objectionable content ads, then they are all suspect.

Kibosh.net